November 5, 2019 Light Design 0Comment

Landscaping can be about more than adding a few flower beds and edging your lawns. With the right landscapers on board, it can be a significant undertaking that transforms your yard for your long-term benefit. However, did you know that some yard additions could require a permit? Read on to learn more about what may and may not need to be run through your local council.

Verandah

There’s no better place to enjoy the sunshine than on your very own verandah or deck. However, if you intend on adding this to your existing abode, then you require a permit. A building contract is also recommended. You will not need a registered builder to carry out the work, but someone skilled in landscape design could make the process go a lot smoother.

Garden Shed

You now have a garden of which you can be proud, but where do you store all the tools of the trade? It might be time to build a garden shed. However, this is yet another addition that could require a permit.

If your shed is on a rural or large property, has no drainage, electricity, or plumbing, and is shorter than 2.1 metres, it may not require one.

Shade Structure or Pergola

Australian summers can be quite intense, and not everyone has a large, shady tree to offer relief. If you are in the process of forming a landscape design plan with a pergola or other shade structure, then know it could require a permit.

There are, however, some exceptions. You may not need building approval if it has less than 30 metres of shade cloth, is freestanding, and is at least five centimetres away from a building. Anything with a shade sail or canvas is worth checking out with your local council.

Fencing

Fencing can be a must-have property addition for many homeowners. It offers peace of mind and is ideal for families with pets and children. Before you start on your new landscape design, be mindful of your permitting requirements. Fences over one metre tall with wind-resistant properties could require a permit. A wire mesh or pool-style fence may not fall into that category.

Retaining Walls

Some landscape designs incorporate retaining walls, but whether or not you require a permit can depend on the type. If you need it to support a structure, you need a permit. If it’s shorter than 600mm and isn’t for support, you don’t.

Trying to navigate the world of council regulations and permits is not easy. It can sometimes take the helping hand of an expert to lead you through the land mines. If you are about to start your landscape design plants, don’t do it alone. Call upon a landscaping expert for help.

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